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Registration for High School Completion Classes must be done IN PERSON.  A complete schedule of classes, including the days and times of classes, will be available at registration.

 

Southgate Adult and Community Education

FALL 2014 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ADULT BASIC EDUCATION

ABE/ESL READING LAB - This class offers individualized learning designed to provide rapid improvement for those with little or no reading skills. Begin with basic reading strategies utilizing phonics, syllable breaking, and sight words.  Move to reading sentences and paragraphs, spelling and pronunciation, sentence writing and paragraph development.  Students will benefit from one-on-one reading practice with a teacher and tutors.  (1 elective credit)

FUNDAMENTAL MATH - This class is recommended for students who have difficulty with basic math concepts: whole numbers, decimals or fractions.  (½ elective credit)

PLATO SKILLS LAB - Do you need practice in basic skills? This self-paced class uses Plato software.  Your skills will be assessed at the beginning of the class, and you will be placed at the appropriate level to begin your instruction.  (½ elective credit)

PLATO READING LAB - Plato Reading Lab is an individualized reading class set up in a multi-leveled lab environment.  Instruction is delivered primarily by computer, with assistance from teacher/tutor as needed.  The lab is designed to help students increase their reading levels as quickly as possible in order to aid comprehension of high school texts.  Each student is assessed and then assigned a curriculum of reading comprehension strategies and critical thinking skills that meets his or her specific needs. (½ elective credit)

PRE-GED PREP  – If you are especially weak in reading, writing, and/or math, you may not be ready to take the GED Prep class.  In the Pre-GED class, instruction will be delivered at a slower pace and will help you strengthen your skills.  Topics covered:  math, language arts, and critical thinking and problem solving skills.  When you complete the Pre-GED class, you may enroll in the GED Prep class free. (½ elective credit)

READING STRATEGIES I/II – This class is for those having difficulty reading basic material.  A variety of instruction is used to help you learn to read, write, and spell through letter sounds and word families.  A variety of strategies are used to improve comprehension of fiction and non-fiction selections.  (½ elective credit)

ENGLISH

BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS – This course examines how business corporations operate and correspond via memos, emails, faxes, business proposals and meetings.  Students will become familiar with business forms used in shipping, receiving, billing, inventory and financial spreadsheets.  Also, entrepreneurs of tomorrow will understand insurance, consumer credit, banking services, legal contracts and taxpayer responsibilities.  (½ English credit)

CREATIVE WRITING – Release your creative urges!  Open up to the creative world of similes, metaphors, and poetry while improving your grammar and punctuation.  Learn how to make your writing more colorful and interesting.  Create a portfolio that includes an autobiography, a short story, and a variety of poems.  (½ English credit)

ELA 9 (A) – This introductory level course will include elements of reading, writing, listening and speaking.  The writing process will include a review of basic grammar, sentence strategies and effective paragraph writing.  The multi-cultural, diverse literature will include such genres as short story, novel, poetry and non-fiction.  Students will develop a mastery of literary terms.  Reading and study skills will include vocabulary development and reading comprehension.  One oral presentation will be included each semester.  (½ English credit)

ELA 9 (B) - This introductory level course will include elements of reading, writing, listening and speaking.  The writing process will include a review of basic grammar, sentence strategies and effective paragraph writing – expository, descriptive and technical.  The multi-cultural, diverse literature will include such genres as short story, novel, poetry and non-fiction.  Students will develop a mastery of literary terms.  Reading and study skills will include vocabulary development and reading comprehension.  One oral presentation will be included each semester.  (½ English credit)

ELA 10 (A) - This intermediate level American literature course will include elements of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and grammar.  Critical analysis and ideas will be emphasized.  The writing will be related to the reading selections but should include descriptive, persuasive, informative and narrative composition.  One oral presentation will be included each semester.  (½ English credit)

ELA 10 (B) -This intermediate level American literature course will include elements of reading, writing, listening and speaking.  Critical analysis and ideas will be emphasized.  The writing will be related to the reading selections but should include descriptive, persuasive, informative and narrative composition.  An effective 3-paragraph essay will be the terminal goal.  Grammar study will include phrases and clauses and advanced sentence structure.  One oral presentation will be included each semester.  (½ English credit)

ELA 11 (A) - Students will learn about the power of language to impact decision making, and to transform a cultures thinking through a variety of mediums including at least one epic poem, historical documents, poetry, articles, and a Shakespearean play.   Literature, class discussions, and projects will focus on heroism, loyalty, the weight of decision-making, and the impact of historical movements from the Anglo-Saxon period though the English Renaissance.  Students will be required to complete at least one five-paragraph essay and at least one oral presentation.  (½ English credit)

ELA 11 (B) - Students will learn about transformational thinking, human nature and the power of survival though a variety of mediums including two novels, a literary memoir, poetry, scientific and historical articles, and the media.  Literature, class discussions, and projects will focus on the role of technology, the consequences of scientific advancement, human nature, the power of fear, survival, and loss from the 18th century through the present.   Students will be required to complete at least one five-paragraph essay and at least one oral presentation. (½ English credit)


ELA 12 (A) – Students will learn about discovering purpose, passion, and leadership potential through a variety of mediums including at least one novel, historical movements and documents, poetry, articles, and the media.  Students will also be introduced to ideas that surround the American Dream, such as opportunity, social mobility, the influence of class, and social protest.  The last half of the semester will be devoted to a culminating senior project about social responsibility.  Students will be required to develop a unique, multimedia project that exhibits not only understanding of the material, but also demonstrates an active commitment to social change.  (½ English credit)

ELA 12 (A) – Students will learn about discovering purpose, passion, and leadership potential through a variety of mediums including at least one novel, historical movements and documents, poetry, articles, and the media.  Students will also be introduced to ideas that surround the American Dream, such as opportunity, social mobility, the influence of class, and social protest.  The last half of the semester will be devoted to a culminating senior project about social responsibility.  Students will be required to develop a unique, multimedia project that exhibits not only understanding of the material, but also demonstrates an active commitment to social change.  (½ English credit)

ELA 12 (B) - Students will learn about shared leadership and the responsibility of the individual through a variety of mediums including at least one novel, historical documents, poetry, articles, and a Greek tragedy.  Literature, class discussions, and projects will focus on the use and abuse of power, leadership, civic responsibility, integrity, and maintaining balance.  The last half of the semester will be devoted to a culminating senior project about global responsibility.  Students will be required to develop a unique, multimedia project that exhibits not only understanding of the material, but also demonstrates an active commitment to social change.  (½ English credit)

JOURNALISM – The Asher school newspaper is back!  This class is designed to familiarize you with the language, structure and research techniques found in newspaper writing.  You will also learn the ethics and responsibilities associated with journalistic writing.  As part of a collaborative team, you will be responsible for independently researching topics of interest or current events in the context of investigative reporting in order to publish our monthly newspaper, The Spill.  (½ English credit)

MASS COMMUNICATION – Which do you trust more….the news you see on the tube or the news you read on the Internet?  How have TV, newspaper, and other forms of mass media shaped your life?  What influence do advertisers have on the choice of music played on the radio?  The course teaches you to examine propaganda, press releases, media history, and study the effects that publicity has on consumerism.  You may also have the chance to test the waters by creating media projects on your own.  (½ English credit)

WRITING WORKSHOP – This is an intermediate, writing intensive class designed to familiarize you with different kinds of composition.  You will learn the basic structure and format of at least three non-fiction genres, including personal narrative, multigenre, and a research based persuasive essay.  Students will learn to brainstorm ideas, narrow their focus, use strong vocabulary, utilize paragraphing techniques, and edit their own work.  Use your experience and knowledge to create pieces of writing that are fun, creative, and inspirational.  (½ English credit)

ESL / ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

This program is for adults whose primary language is not English.  All levels teach language skills, listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the context of real-life survival skills, as follows:

ESL BEGINNING - In a comfortable and encouraging atmosphere, adults whose primary language is not English will learn the basic patterns of written and spoken English language.

ESL CONVERSATIONAL ENGLISH AND READING – Students will focus on role-playing and other activities that center around building confidence in speaking English.  Short selections of reading are also emphasized.

ESL ENGLISH APPLICATIONS – Students will learn and apply realistic English language skills in everyday applications.  This includes workplace and American cultural lessons in order to improve reading, listening, speaking and writing English.

ESL READING – Students taking this course will learn how to identify main ideas and use context clues to define meanings in paragraphs and short writings.

ESL SPEAKING/LISTENING – Students will learn how to express needs, wants, and desires using standard spoken English.  Students will learn how to vary sentence structure, use of punctuation, and standard grammar and spelling.

ESL WRITING – Students will learn how to write simple to complex forms of sentences with an emphasis on the use of standard grammar, punctuation, and spelling.

SOCIAL STUDIES

AMERICAN HISTORY/GEOGRAPHY (A) – Students will gain historical and geographical knowledge of American history from the rise of modern industry (1877) to the end of the Great Depression.  (½ American history credit)

AMERICAN HISTORY/GEOGRAPHY (B) – Students will gain historical and geographical knowledge of American History from World War II to present.  (½ American history credit)

CURRENT EVENTS – This course will promote interest in news from the state, nation, and the world.  Students will develop skills in finding news sources and information from those sources.  (¼  social studies credit)

ECONOMICS – Money defines us and influences others, and it’s all controlled by economic systems designed to make things work.  Learn how those economic systems work, how you can work the system, and how you can change the system.  Class includes both microeconomics and macroeconomics and covers decision-making by individuals, by companies, and by the government.  (½ economics credit)

GOVERNMENT - Learn how and why the government was created, what it does, and how you can influence the government.  (½ government credit)

PSYCHOLOGY - Why do we behave as we do?  Explore individual human behavior.  Study personality differences, biological differences, and abnormal psychology.  Learn what different theorists, such as Freud, Maslow, and Skinner, believed.  (½ social studies credit)

SOCIOLOGY – Learn why groups are created and how they work.  Understand the rules of society and your role in it.  Study the creation and function of family, school, and work.  (½ social studies credit)

UNSOLVED MYSTERIES –  Unravel the mysteries of civilizations and contemporary culture.  (¼  social studies credit)

WORLD HISTORY/GEOGRAPHY (A) –  Students will gain historical and geographical knowledge of world history from the Middle Ages to the beginning of the Industrial Revolution.  (½  world history credit)

WORLD HISTORY/GEOGRAPHY (B) –  Students will gain historical and geographical knowledge of world history from the Industrial Revolution to the present Age of Globalization.  (½  world history credit)

G.E.D.

Please note:  GED Prep classes are designed for students who need a refresher course
and will be ready to enter the GED testing process.

To prepare in all four subject areas (language arts, social studies, math, and science),
a student is encouraged to enroll in GED prep classes two days/evenings per week.

GED LANGUAGE ARTS/SOCIAL STUDIES – This class is designed for students to review language arts and social studies topics for new 2014 GED Test.  Students will practice test taking skills in our computer lab.  (½ elective credit)

GED MATH/SCIENCE – This class is designed for students to review math and science topics for new 2014 GED Test.  Students will practice test taking skills in our computer lab.  (½ elective credit)

PRE-GED PREP  – If you are especially weak in reading, writing, and/or math, you may not be ready to take the GED Prep class.  In the Pre-GED class, instruction will be delivered at a slower pace and will help you strengthen your skills.  Topics covered:  math, language arts, and critical thinking and problem solving skills.  When you complete the Pre-GED class, you may enroll in the GED Prep class free. (½ elective credit)

MATH

ALGEBRA I (A) – This course covers the first half of the requirements for the Michigan Merit Curriculum for Algebra I.  Students will study linear relationships, topics related to number theory and geometry, mathematics as a symbolic language, and algebraic modeling for solving real-world problems.  (½ algebra I credit)

ALGEBRA I (B) – This course covers the second half of the requirements for the Michigan Merit Curriculum for Algebra I.  Students will study exponential, logarithmic, quadratic, power, and polynomial functions; the number domain from real to complex numbers; and algebraic modeling of these relationships for solving real-world problems.  (½ algebra I credit)

ALGEBRA II (A) - This course covers the first half of the requirements for the Michigan Merit Curriculum for Algebra II.  Students will study functions, equations and graphs; linear systems; matrices; quadratic equations and functions; and polynomials and polynomial functions.  (½ algebra II credit)

ALGEBRA II (B) – This course covers the second half of the requirements for the Michigan Merit Curriculum for Algebra II.  Students will study radical functions and exponents, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational functions, quadratic functions, sequences and series, probability and statistics, and trigonometry.  (½ algebra II credit)

GEOMETRY (A) – This course covers the first half of the requirements for the Michigan Merit Curriculum for Geometry.  Students will develop analytic and spatial reasoning, make connections from algebraic reasoning to geometric situations, and develop formal logic and proof reasoning skills that can be applied to both mathematical and real-world problem contexts.   (½ geometry credit)

GEOMETRY (B) – This course covers the second half of the requirements for the Michigan Merit Curriculum for Geometry.  Course covers transformations, similar polygons, area and volume of one- and two-dimensional figures, Pythagorean theorem, introduction to trigonometry, and circle properties.  Prerequisite:  Geometry (A) or equivalent   (½ geometry credit)

PERSONAL FINANCE - This course will educate high school students about sound money management skills and the financial planning process, and will also help them to begin to develop positive behaviors that are necessary to attaining financial maturity and achieving a secure future. The course will cover financial planning, budgeting, investing, using credit wisely, how to handle your money, insurance, your career, and other personal financing issues.  (½ math credit)

PRE-ALGEBRA - This course prepares students for Algebra I.   Topics include: algebraic expressions and integers, solving multi-step equations and inequalities, decimals and equations, factors, fractions, exponents, ratios, proportions, and percents.  (½ math credit)

WHAT ARE THE ODDS? - An introductory probability and statistics course.   The students will study theoretical, experimental, and conditional probability as well as data analysis.   The class takes a hands-on approach to mathematics.   (½ math credit)

SCIENCE

BIOLOGY (A) – A study of living organisms.  Topics will include the cell, bacteria, and genetics.  (½ science credit)

BIOLOGY (B) – A study of living organisms.  Topics will include plants, animals, and biomes.  (½ science credit)

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE - The scientific study of how the living and nonliving aspects of our world interact.  Emphasis will be placed on the impact humans have on our natural world.  (½ science credit)

FORENSIC SCIENCE – Students will learn the basics of forensic science and will be exposed to the lab skills commonly used during a forensics investigation. Students will acquire the lab skills of observation, microscopy, chromatography, and DNA gel electrophoresis (commonly referred to as DNA fingerprinting),and hair analysis among other things. They will work in cooperative groups and prepare logical conclusions based on data.  (¼  science credit)

GENERAL SCIENCE (A) – This class is an introduction to scientific thinking with a focus on the Earth’s systems and chemistry.  (½ science credit)

PHYSICS (A) – The scientific study of the natural world and our interactions within.  Topics include energy, matter, and motion.  (½ science credit)

PHYSICS (B) – The scientific study of the natural world and our interactions within.  Topics include electricity, magnetism, thermodynamics, and GENERAL SCIENCE (A) – This class is an introduction to scientific thinking with a focus on the Earth’s systems and chemistry.  (½ science credit)

PHYSICS COACH – This is a support class to be taken along with Physics (A) or (B).  Work individually or in small groups and receive tutoring in those topic areas that are difficult for you.   (¼ science credit)

TECHNOLOGY

MICROSOFT OFFICE – Student can choose any or all of these intermediate level classes:  Word I & II, Excel I & II, or PowerPoint I & II.  Prerequisite: Computer Applications or equivalent experience and keyboarding 30 wpm.  Class may be taken more than once with instructor approval.  (½ technology credit)

ROBOTICS – Working in teams of two, students will assemble a robots from Legos and use software to program robot behavior.  Students will progress through activities to teach programming, behaviors, systems, controls, sensors, feedback, and more.  Along the way, students will address key technology and science concepts.   (½ technology credit)

WEB DESIGN – This is a hands-on, project-oriented class.  Students will develop real world technology skills while engaging in problem solving and higher-level thinking.  Students will learn about the importance of social and political issues surrounding technology (privacy, ethics, responsibility, and liability).  (½ technology credit)

VOCATIONAL

ACCOUNTING I - This class is an introduction to basic accounting principles, double-entry accounting, and preparation of balance sheets, income statements, and statements of cash flow. In addition basic principles and terminology of accounting, instruction will provide initial understanding of the preparation of budgets and financial reports and career opportunities in the accounting field.  (½ elective credit)

CAREERS FOR TODAY 1 – Explore career opportunities using technology resources and the online course Career Forward.  Online, students will research a variety of career paths, learn “soft skills” for employment, create a resume, prepare for an interview, and investigate training opportunities and financial aid.  This course fulfills the online requirement of the Michigan Merit Curriculum.  (½ online or elective credit)

CAREERS FOR TODAY 2 – Explore career opportunities using language arts skills and the online course Career Forward.  Students will use their language arts skills to create a resume and cover letter, prepare for an interview, research a variety of career paths, learn “soft skills” for employment, and investigate training opportunities and financial aid.  This course fulfills the online requirement of the Michigan Merit Curriculum.  (½ online or English elective credit)

CAREERS FOR TODAY 3 – Explore career opportunities using knowledge of the global economy and the online course Career Forward.  Students will research global employment trends and career paths, learn “soft skills” for employment, create a resume, prepare for an interview, and investigate training opportunities and financial aid.  This course fulfills the online requirement of the Michigan Merit Curriculum.  (½ online or social studies elective credit)

FASHION MERCHANDISING – Learn the basics of fashion and design.  Discuss the history of fashion and fashion trends and research how fashion has impacted society.  Learn through lecture, hands-on activities, guest speakers, and field trips.  (¼ elective credit)

HEALTH CARE PROVIDER I - Prepare yourself for an entry-level position with a home health agency, a hospital, or community health agency.  Basic nursing care is taught in an academic and clinical environment by health care professionals in affiliation with a local hospital.   Participate in clinical rotations at a nursing home and hospital.  Learn basic anatomy and terminology, infection control, monitoring vital signs, nutrition, body mechanics, long-term care, death/dying preparation, home care equipment, CPR, phlebotomy, and health assistance in home care.  Join the fastest growing occupation in Michigan.  Students must wear hospital scrubs to class.  Tuition fee for all students:  $295.  Tuition payment plan is available.

HEALTH CARE PROVIDER II – This class is available to students who have completed Home Health Care Provider I or by instructor approval.  Students will participate in clinical rotations at a local hospital.  Students must wear hospital scrubs to class.  Tuition fee for all students:  $295.  Tuition payment plan is available.

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY - Are you interested in becoming part of a health care team?  As you prepare to enter the health care field, you will need to learn its language and become familiar with anatomy and physiology as it relates to health and disease.  This class is a must for many health care and related occupations:  receptionist for a doctor’s or dentist’s office, hospital and medical secretaries, clerks, medical insurance processors, nurse assistants, and many other occupations.  Join our class and have fun learning.  Tuition fee for all students:  $95.

HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION

FITNESS AND HEALTHY LIVING – The basic principles of personal fitness and human nutrition are explored, emphasizing the nutrients, food sources, and their importance to be healthy throughout life. This course also looks at contemporary fitness and nutrition issues.  (½ physical education credit)

GOLF, LIFETIME SPORTS, AND FITNESS – During the first eight weeks, students will be introduced to the basic rules of golf, various golf strokes, and golf etiquette.  During class time, students will be required to attend a driving range and various local golf courses.  For the second eight weeks, students will be introduced to personal fitness, nutrition, and wallyball.    Classroom instruction, a written exam, and physical participation are required in all units.  May be taken only once.  (½ physical education credit)

HEALTH –  This course is a comprehensive health education course. It covers nutrition, physical activity, alcohol, tobacco, other drugs, safety, social health, emotional health, communicable diseases, HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. At least one oral presentation will be required.  (½ health education credit)

PHYSICAL EDUCATION – This course is designed to help the student to understand his/her physical self, to understand the value of team and individual sports, and to realize the need for and a way of maintaining a level of physical fitness throughout life.  Classroom instruction, a written exam, and physical participation are required in all units.  May be taken only once.  (½ physical education credit)

FINE ARTS

3-D ART –  This class will approach artistic projects such as paper and plaster sculpture, weaving, and mobile design in a 3-dimensional style.  Students will understand the historic and visual aspects of the design of art.  They will process an idea from brainstorming, to a 2-dimensional sketch, into a 3-dimensional format, developing creative problem solving skills.  (½ fine arts credit)

ART - SPECIAL PROJECTS –  In this class, students will create special creative projects.  These artistic endeavors will entertain, promote reflection, and initiate artistic understanding for both the artist and the viewer.  Other curriculum, such as English, social studies, and math will be directly integrated into this course.  Assignments will include stagecraft and puppetry with scriptwriting, totem pole construction, and metal-cover journal bookmaking.  The culmination of these projects will result in an art exhibit designed by the students.  (¼ fine arts credit)

CREATIVE DESIGN – This class will expand on the elements of art and principals of design using a graphic style approach to art.  Students will practice and gain understanding of advertising art as they recognize their own sense of design, combining the concept of “what sells” with a personal sense of style.  Artistic technical proficiency will be the ultimate intention of this class.  (½ fine arts credit)

INTRODUCTION TO ART – This is an introductory class into the visual arts.  Students will experience various mediums and processes by which to create.  The elements of art and principles of design will be covered as well as specific techniques for each medium.  Students will be introduced to color theory and design.  Through the creative process, students will gain an insight into art, art history, perception and critical reflection.  (½ fine arts credit)

WORLD LANGUAGES

SPANISH I - Students will learn basic Spanish grammar and practice the basic skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing with an emphasis upon oral and written expression and comprehension. Students are also introduced to various aspects of Hispanic culture in Latin American countries and in Spain.  (½ world languages credit)

SPANISH II - Students will build on grammar and language skills acquired in the first year language courses, applying this grammar to more complex thematic contexts. Students will explore cultural and historical themes and topics relating to Latin America, Spain and Hispanics in the U.S.  (½ world languages credit)

GENERAL ELECTIVES

BASKETBALL TECH  –  This class will help students develop knowledge, experience, and skills in basketball.  This class is not PE credit.  Class may be taken only once.  (½ elective credit)

CHESS AND LOGIC GAMES - Learn to play chess, or improve your chess skills, and try new and interesting games of logic.  Chess and other logic games have been shown to improve academic performance.  They help improve critical thinking, reasoning, memory, concentration, and patience…all while having fun!  (¼ elective credit)

CRIMINAL MINDS – Why do people commit crimes? This course looks at the psychological factors involved, such as characteristics, patterns, and disorders that are linked to criminal behavior. Also explores the interaction between psychology and the legal system, such as eyewitness testimony, criminal profiling, the insanity defense, and imprisonment. (¼ elective credit)

GOLF – This course is dedicated to the study and practice of the game of golf.  PGA pros will provide some of the instruction to help each student golfer perfect his/her game.  May be taken only once.  (¼ elective credit)

SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING  –  This course enables students to understand and examine the decisions that sports entertainment and recreation marketers  make in managing professional sports teams, travel and hotel lines, leisure recreation activities such as theme parks, theaters or golf courses.  Learn how effective advertising messages promote fan clubs, products, and services along with consumer sales.  (½ elective credit)

LEARNING CENTER

The Learning Center offers high school and basic courses under the supervision of a teacher in a computer-assisted learning center.  Over 20 classes are offered.  The Learning Center is ideal for students who learn better through self-directed study

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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